State-of-the-Art Technology for a Complete Solution Ceramic Membrane

GEA Filtration is a world leader in cross-flow membrane filtration, with reverse osmosis and nano-, ultra-, and micro-filtration as core technologies.

GEA ceramic membranes are ideally suited for value-added or sanitary products, as well as applications requiring selective separations from fluid streams that contain aggressive components such as solvents.

Technology and function of ceramic membrane elements

Ceramic Membranes
Ceramic Membranes

Dynamic filtration using ceramic membrane elements allows for the maximum mechanical and chemical stability, coupled with the lowest possible flow resistance.  Membranes are constructed using a support made of pure α-Al2O3 with a macroporous structure. The membrane is applied to this support material and consists of at least one, but usually several, layers of highly porous ceramic, with a precisely defined texture. The layer with the finest porosity determines the filtration characteristics.

GEA offers a broad, application-specific range of membranes and element geometries with rated pore sizes of 1 to 1400 nanometers making them ideal for use in microfiltration and ultrafiltration processes. 

The superb properties of such membrane elements are used successfully in GEA filter systems worldwide:

  • Inert material
  • Acid and lye resistant
  • Solvent-resistant
  • Regenerative
  • Backflush capability
  • Wear-resistant
  • Long service life
  • Reliable
  • Heat-resistant, steam-sterilizable

The ceramic multi-channel element

The body of the basic module, the ceramic multi-channel element, is manufactured using highly porous ceramic material with several round channels running parallel to its longitudinal axis, with the membrane mounted on the surface.

The feed material flows into the channels along the membrane.  A partial stream then passes through the membrane as filtrate and is discharged by the carrier material. The very high permeability makes the pressure loss on passing through the carrier so low that it is negligible compared with the pressure drop when passing through the extremely thin membrane.

 

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